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Environmental and community activists turned out in Chicago to protest against Peoples Gas’ request for a $402 million rate hike for next year.

“We don’t think consumers should be having to spend more money to rebuild fossil fuel pipelines,” said activist Caroline Wooten.

Dozens of activists showed up to Thursday’s Illinois Commerce Commission meeting to make their final plea before the commission votes on November 16.

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Media Article

Massachusetts outlines new strategy for getting customers and utilities off gas

After more than three years of considering the future of the natural gas industry in Massachusetts and what role it can play in the state's efforts to significantly reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, the state's Department of Public Utilities issued an order meant to signal to gas utilities that it won't be business as usual going forward.
Illinois Commerce Commission chair announces decision favoring clean energy
Media Article

Advocates hail regulatory ‘earthquake’ as state slashes requested gas rate increases

Illinois regulators unanimously approved rate hikes for four major natural gas utilities, but slashed the utilities' requested rate increases by as much as 50%. The regulators also launched a series of "future of gas" hearings that will for the first time hold the utilities accountable for aligning their planning with the state's 100% clean energy goals. "As the state embarks on a journey toward a 100% clean energy economy, the gas system's operations will not continue to exist in its current form," the Commission's Chairman said in a statement.
urban lights at night in winter
Media Article

Understanding energy behaviors for a more equitable future

Dr. Destenie Nock published a new study based on research in Chicago showing that low-income households turn on their cooling systems in hot weather three degrees later than higher income households, but they turn on heat in cold weather six degrees earlier than high income households, whether because of poor insulation or other reasons. “This work highlights the challenges low-income communities face. Not only are they at higher risk in the summer, but in the winter they have to spend a lot more money to protect their pipes from freezing,” noted Nock. “The financial stress of heating homes in winter can also lead to broader inequities.” Dr. Nock's data can be used to shape policies that address systemic inequities, guide investments in infrastructure, and help improve living conditions for energy-insecure and vulnerable households. Dr. Nock has provided expert testimony in Illinois rate case proceedings.